Earth’s chemical imbalance

Et tu, Earth? Yes, Earth too. There is large debate about the reason for climate change with all sorts of data thrown about like the significant CO2 output of human activity. I, for one say yes, human activity is the culprit and the current weather imbalance is a reflection of our own off-kilter lives. In short, we consume more than we need and we definitely take more than we replenish.

If earth was my patient, my diagnosis would be this: Stage 3 human cancer isolated to earth’s outermost crust. The cancer can be successfully treated and removed with severe weather. Earth’s long-term prognosis is good. In the meantime…

Broomfield / Lafayette border, Colo. (AP Photo / Cliff Grassmick)

Broomfield / Lafayette border, Colo. (AP Photo / Cliff Grassmick)

In severe weather news this week we have flooding in Colorado. Parts of Colorado saw heavier rainfall in one day than it has in all other days in the last 95 years. Just another record-breaker? Yes and no. Yes, it’s another record, but the pattern suggests this kind of record-breaking is a new norm that started only in the last decade.  This new norm coincides with warmer temperatures also this past decade, as mentioned in a previous post.

For instance, last St. Patrick’s day was the warmest St. Patty’s day recorded in Chicago since 1872. And last year’s hurricane Sandy holds a few record-breaking facts: its central pressure at landfall was the lowest recorded pressure of all storms on the Atlantic coast since 1938 (lower central pressure is generally equated with stronger storms) and the ensuing storm surge surpassed the previous 1960 record of 10-feet by nearly a whopping 4 feet causing New York City to essentially shutdown, including the subway and the stock exchange.

As for this week’s record, if you were a resident of Boulder for the last 95 years you would say “Heavy summer rains are normal here, but this…I have never seen rain like this before…ever.”

Coal Creek, Golden Colorado Sept 12, 2013 (AP photo/Reuters/Rick Wilking)

The reality of such record-breaking weather is sweeping forces of destruction. So far there are four reported deaths due to Colorado’s flooding. 

Perhaps nature is decidedly the ultimate healer of healers, knowing best how to treat its own ailments–treating earth’s higher temperatures with droughts and deluge, which wreaks temporary havoc on its surface, but effectively disrupts large-scale human activity. One day we just might be disrupted enough to change the way we do things.

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